Experts tell me to stop taking vitamins and supplements. Should I comply?


Vitamin PillsThe Annals of Internal Medicine recently released a controversial editorial picked up by the major wire services that urges the public to stop taking vitamin and mineral supplements because it’s believed that they are a waste of money and can do more harm than good. Is this true?

First Step

First, let’s analyze whether the average diet today contains a healthy and complete mix of essential nutrients. Do you know where and how your food was grown? Did much of it come from soils free of harmful chemicals, or were they produced from genetically altered seeds made in a lab? Do your meals often come in bags and boxes from fast food restaurants? Do you treat your body like a garbage dump, oblivious to the ingredients that you’re asking your body to digest? If you shrug your shoulders and plead ignorance to these questions, do you ever wonder why your energy level is often impaired and why your health seems to suffer?

Modern farming methods that rely on the heavy use of chemical fertilizers have stripped the topsoil of its sulfur, which is nature’s detoxification agent and oxygen transporter. Much of what is commonly consumed today consists of highly processed foods, devoid of nutritious minerals.

The standard argument offered by mainstream medicine is that disease can only be treated using patented drugs and that nutritional supplements offer little or no health benefits, despite evidence to the contrary.

Help Make Your Body 62% Stronger – Flood it With This Inexpensive Nutrient (astaxanthin)
Source: Dr. Mercola, June 15, 2011

Second Step

Now, let’s look closely at the Annals of Internal Medicine and whose interests it serves.

According to Natural News editor Mike Adams, the Annals of Internal Medicine is a publication almost entirely funded by pharmaceutical companies that develop and promote drugs which compete directly with supplements and multivitamins. More importantly, Adams believes their studies are deliberately designed to fail, as they rely on skewed results obtained from taking very low potency, synthetic vitamins and inorganic minerals that are manufactured by companies that are owned by these same pharmaceutical interests. In other words, there is a strong financial incentive to cast multivitamins in as negative light as possible to help the pharmaceutical firms aggressively promote their prescription medicines and drugs.

For example, Centrum® Silver Adults 50+ is a multivitamin supplement marketed by Pfizer, a major drug concern. As noted by this abbreviated ingredients list, the potency contained in this supplement is way too small to have a positive impact on personal health and disease prevention.

Vitamin B1 1.5 mg
Vitamin B2 1.7 mg
Vitamin B6 3.0 mg
Vitamin B12 0.025 mg
Lutein 0.250 mg
Magnesium 50 mg

Centrum® Silver contains corn starch, calcium stearate (a derivative of stearic acid), maltodextrin, triglycerides, and tocopherols (a synthetic form of Vitamin E) that are likely to be made from genetically modified ingredients, per the Non-GMO Shopping Guide website. Centrum® Silver also contains these known additives, chemicals, and preservatives:

crospovidone
sucrose
hydrogenated palm oil
polyvinyl alcohol
polyethylene glycol
BHT (butylated hydroxytoluene)
sodium benzoate

Descriptions

Crospovidone is an excipient (inactive ingredient) found in many medications. It is classified as a disintegrant which is used to help a tablet break up in the body so it can be absorbed.
Source: Drugs.com

The bottom line is that any product you buy that says “sugar” or “sucrose” is almost certainly at least partially if not completely GMO beet sugar unless it is certified organic or labeled as 100% cane sugar.
Source: “Natural” Sodas Made with GMO Sugar Scam Consumers
The Healthy Home Economist, Aug 13, 2013

Palm Oil Not A Healthy Substitute For Trans Fats, Study Finds
Source: Science Daily, May 11, 2009

Polyvinyl alcohol is a colorless, water-soluble synthetic resin employed principally in the treating of textiles and paper
Source: Encyclopedia Brittanica

Polyethylene glycol 3350 is used to treat occasional constipation. Potential side effects include: severe or bloody diarrhea; bleeding from your rectum; blood in your stools; or severe and worsening stomach pain, cramping, or bloating.
Source: Rx List

Butylated hydroxytoluene is a synthetic antioxidant used as a preservative in lipsticks and moisturizers. It is also widely used as a food preservative. BHT can induce allergic reactions in the skin. Long-term exposure to high doses of BHT is toxic in mice and rats, causing liver, thyroid and kidney problems and affecting lung function and blood coagulation. Limited evidence suggests that high doses of BHT may mimic estrogen, the primary female sex hormone, and prevent expression of male sex hormones, resulting in adverse reproductive affects.
Source: David Suzuki Foundation

Sodium benzoate is a preservative that promotes cancer and kills healthy cells
Source: Natural News, Sep. 29, 2011

Conclusion
Headline news stories promoted an editorial that advised consumers to “stop wasting money on vitamin and mineral supplements” based on biased studies. If the public neglects their overall health by not exercising regularly and takes no other nutritional supplement such as fish oil or curcumin, it’s unreasonable to expect to see a major benefit if they simply rely on a synthetic, low-potency multivitamin like Centrum® Silver that also contains toxic chemicals and preservatives. When it comes to protecting against degenerative disease, healthy lifestyle choices are essential.

Additional Resources

Flawed Research Used to Attack Multivitamin Supplements
By Blake Gossard, Kira Schmid, ND, Luke Huber, ND, MBA, Steven V. Joyal, MD
Life Extension

Vitamins and Minerals Are Essential to Good Health—CRN responds to misguided editorial in Annals of Internal Medicine
Council for Responsible Nutrition

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One Response to “Experts tell me to stop taking vitamins and supplements. Should I comply?”

  1. admin Says:

    How TheWeek.com got swindled into pushing Big Pharma’s anti-nutrition propaganda
    by: Jonathan Benson, staff writer
    Natural News
    Sunday, December 22, 2013

    http://tinyurl.com/mkg9vd5

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