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Author Topic: Natural sulfur in Icelanders diets keeps their diabetes rate low
perseus101
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Post Natural sulfur in Icelanders diets keeps their diabetes rate low
on: September 8, 2013, 20:08
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Could Sulfur Deficiency be a Contributing Factor in Obesity, Heart Disease, Alzheimer's and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?
by Stephanie Seneff
seneff at csail dot mit dot edu
Sep 15, 2010

Sulfur Availability and Obesity Rates

The ultimate source of sulfur is volcanic rock, mainly basalt, spewed up from the earth's core during volcanic eruptions.

In her recently published book, "The Jungle Effect," Dr. Daphne Miller devotes a full chapter to Iceland (pp. 127-160). In this chapter, she struggles to answer the question of why Icelanders enjoy such remarkably low rates of depression, despite living at a northern latitude. She points out, furthermore, their excellent health record in other key areas: "When compared to North Americans, they have almost half the death rate from heart disease and diabetes, significantly less obesity, and a greater life expectancy. In fact, the average life span for Icelanders is amongst the longest in the world." (P. 133).

While she proposes that their high fish consumption, with associated high intake of omega three fats, may plausibly be the main beneficial source, she puzzles over the fact that former Icelanders who moved to Canada and also eat lots of fish do not also enjoy the same decreased rate of depression and heart disease.

In my view, the key to Icelanders' good health lies in the string of volcanoes that make up the backbone of the island, which sits atop the mid-Atlantic ridge crest. Dr. Miller pointed out (p. 136) that the mass exodus to Canada was due to extensive volcanic eruptions in the late 1800's that blanketed the highly cultivated southeast region of the country. This means, of course, that the soils are highly enriched in sulfur. The cabbage, beets, and potatoes that are staples of the Icelandic diet are likely providing far more sulfur to Icelanders than their counterparts in the American diet provide.

http://bit.ly/1fOtCWi

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